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This music therapy video of my work with a child with autism illustrates the following...

  • Playing individual keys on the piano can be an effective way to help a child develop finger individuation and extension
  • Using preferred music as a motivator can be a great way to help a child improve his/her communication skills
  • Pausing recorded or live music can create tension that motivates a child to communicate or use other skills in order to make the music continue
  • Reflecting a child's sign language through singing will reinforce and reward the child's sign language

To read a transcription of this music therapy and autism post, please click here

This music therapy video of my work with a child with autism illustrates the following...

  • Music can be a effective part of an autism therapy approach and it can help redirect a child
  • Using pauses in music to encourage eye contact and expressive communication
  • Using visual phonetics to help a child learn how to form sounds (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=De5nVclM4Y8)
  • Combining music, humor and fun to motivate a child to work on therapeutic goals
  • When working with a child who is non-verbal try limiting the amount of spoken language that you use.  Too much speaking can overwhelm and confuse a child who is non-verbal.

To read a transcription of this music therapy and autism video, please click here.

 

This video shows you how to use music and "Sing and Read" books to practice speech skills as part of a Down syndrome treatment program.  Please sign up for my newsletter full of great musical special education resources at http://www.therhythmtree.com/user-registration    

This music therapy video illustrates the following...

  • Sing and Read books make it easy for the non-musician to use music to help a child reach their therapeutic goals (Comprehensive
    list of Sing and Read Books: http://info.infosoup.org/lists/ReadAndSing.asp?BookListID=29
  • Using slower speech and exaggerated articulation can help a child process speech better and learn how words are articulated
  • Using visual phonetics helps a child understand how to articulate specific sounds (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=De5nVclM4Y8)
  • Using dramatic voices can draw in a child's attention and make therapeutic work fun and motivating
  • Using an anticipatory breath combined with wait time is an effective way to let a child know that they are expected to respond

To read a transcription of this music therapy and Down syndrome video post, please click here

Video shared by on in Video Blog

Please sign up for my newsletter full of great tips and special education resources at http://www.therhythmtree.com/user-registration    

This video of my work as a music therapist illustrates the following...

  • Using music to address academic goals
  • Following a client's lead to make a musical experience more successful and enjoyable
  • Incororating humor to increase the fun and motivational elements of the activity
  • Using music to get the repetition without the monotony

 

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